South Boston Waterfront

April 2015, South Boston Waterfront, Museum

jalwa

jalwa at the ica  (sonya kovacic)

jalwa at the ica (sonya kovacic)

Jalwa:
Boston University's premier co-ed fusion dance team will feature a lively, arresting mix of dance styles including bollywood, hip-hop, bhangra, and contemporary.
-ICA First Fridays


"Constantly integrating traditional and modern styles of dance from the East and the West, Jalwa pushes limits with its choreography and fusion elements. Jalwa, or  “passion” in Hindi, is what unites this team – a passion to dance, a passion to perform, and a passion to create excitement within the crowd."
-BU Student Activities


Take a look at thier performance at Tufaan 2014, an annual college Bollywood dance competition held at Northwestern University in Chicago. And read more about the team.

Looking for a new workout? BollyX is a Bollywood-inspired dance-fitness program that combines dynamic choreography and intensive workouts with the hottest music from around the world. You can find classes in Boston here.
 


March 2015, Museum, South Boston Waterfront

television

barry mcgee installation  at the ica  (sonya kovacic)

barry mcgee installation at the ica (sonya kovacic)

The Boston Neighborhood Network (BNN) is a 24 hour TV station as well as a non profit media center located in Egleston Square and Kenmore Square.

It acts as a public forum for all Boston residents, nonprofit and community-based organizations, and governmental and educational institutions, providing them with affordable training and access to emerging media technologies.

You can find News and Info on Channel 9 (Comcast), Channel 15 (RCN) and
Community TV on Channel 23 (Comcast) and Channel 83 (RCN).

Some programs include:

  • Pyschic voices
  • LaShena's Hour
  • Talk of the Neighborhoods
  • Seniors Count
  • Boston Profiles
  • Pulla's Hood Famous TV
  • Toward a Quality of LIfe
  • The Arabic Hour
  • Style it Up
  • Mature Hypnosis
  • The Struggle

BNN has a People's Platform where Boston residents can express what's on their mind on TV.

You can also live stream BNN here.

March 2015, South Boston Waterfront

from the archives

Today is Friday the 13th. We wrote about that date in our 15th post on May 23, 2015. Enjoy!


dancing on the deck at ICA first fridays  

dancing on the deck at ICA first fridays 

Although the unlucky origins of "Friday the Thirteenth" are historically unclear, one historian suggests that the superstition became widespread after a Boston millionaire wrote and published a novel in the early 20th century. The man was Thomas W. Lawson, and he was well-known in Boston as a stockbroker, copper magnate, businessman, and even U.S. Senate candidate. In 1907, he published Friday, the Thirteenth, which tells the story of a stockbroker who uses the day to create a stock market crash. The story was a precautionary tale about stock market manipulation, but it's also one of the earliest instances of the day being considered unlucky.

The story doesn't end there. Lawson was known for several other ventures, including his namesake: the giant seven-masted schooner, named, appropriately, the Thomas W. Lawson. The ship was the largest pure sailing vessel ever built, but ultimately crashed and wrecked in a storm. The date? It was the night of December 13, 1907 (a Friday).


Not unlucky: over sixty Boston-area museums and cultural venues will open their doors for free this summer in a series of "Free Fun Fridays."

December 2014, South Boston Waterfront

breweries

harpoon brewery (d_dusseault)

harpoon brewery (d_dusseault)

Today's photo comes from Desiree Dusseault from Southie. Desiree works for the city and has this to say about Boston:

"I love the pride that Bostonians have for the city whether they have lived here for a year or for their entire life. I like how Boston's government tries to make the city a better place. And lastly, I love the scenery and being able to go for a walk and find a busy ocean bay or river. "


Beer making in Boston was in its heyday in the early 1900’s. Try to imagine the clatter of horse-drawn, iron-wheeled, wagons bringing raw materials in and finished product out of the 24 breweries in Roxbury and Jamaica Plain which were located on or near Columbus Avenue, Heath Street and Amory Street. Add the pungent odors of hops, yeast, slowly cooking grains and the coal and wood smoke billowing from each of the 24 smokestacks and you begin to sense the impact these breweries had on their neighborhoods.

-Jamaica Plain Historical Society


Read the whole Jamaica Plain Historical Society article about Boston's brewery history.

Take a look at some Boston brewery posters.


Want to visit some breweries? Boston Brew Tours offers tours of various breweries in Boston.

South Boston Waterfront, October 2014, Landmark

hood

hood milk bottle, fort point (sonya kovacic)

hood milk bottle, fort point (sonya kovacic)

After yesterday's email one of our subscribers, Robert McGovern, told us about another T.rex in the area - the orange T.rex that resides at the mini golf course on Route 1 Saugaus. -  Thanks Rob!


The iconic Hood milk bottle has been in Fort Point since 1977, two years before the Children's Museum moved to Fort Point from JP. HP Hood, a dairy company founded in Charlestown and currently operating in Lynnfield, bought and refurbished the big milk bottle before donating it to the Children's Museum. Previously the milk bottle was used as an ice cream stand in Taunton. The bottle is 40 feet tall, 18 feet in diameter and weighs 15,000 pounds - and if it was a real milk bottle it would hold around 58,620 gallons of milk.

Hood has another well known structure in Boston - the Hood blimp. The blimp flies over Red Sox games in the summer, is approximately the length of three school buses, and even has its own twitter page.


In 2010, the Boston Police Department started a campaign called Operation Hoodsie Cupas a way to engage the community. Every summer since, the BPD ice cream truck has circled around different Boston neighborhoods giving out hoodsie cups. 

South Boston Waterfront, September 2014

construction

elevator shaft, fort point (sonya kovacic)

elevator shaft, fort point (sonya kovacic)

One of Boston's most famous landmarks – the Bunker Hill Monument – took nearly 18 years to complete. After its cornerstone was laid in 1825, the monument's construction was disrupted so frequently that many Charlestown residents just wanted the whole thing demolished. Essentially, there wasn't enough money.

That is until Sarah Josepha Hale, a writer and editor, took up the cause. Described as "Oprah and Martha Stewart combined", Hale raised funds through her magazine (asking for $1 from every reader) and by organizing a massive craft fair at Quincy Market. She successfully raised $30,000 for the monument's completion, and soon after (in 1843), the capstone was laid.

(Sarah Josepha Hale's historic influence extends well beyond the monument — her accomplishments include writing "Mary Had a Little Lamb", and helping to create the holiday of Thanksgiving.)


The Bunker Hill Monument wasn't the only controversial project in the city's history. Boston is home to the most expensive highway construction project in the U.S.: The Big Dig. See some stunning black & white photos of the massive undertaking by Michael Hintlian here.

South Boston Waterfront, August 2014

harborwalk

harborwalk and children's museum  ( @gteresa )

harborwalk and children's museum (@gteresa)

Today's photo was submitted by Teresa, from Somerville.


The Boston HarborWalk extends all the way from the Neponset River (at Pope John Paul II Park) through Dorchester, South Boston, Fort Point, Downtown, the North End, Charlestown, and East Boston.

The Walk connects with several of Boston's other paths, including the Freedom Trail, the Charles River Esplanade and Bike Path, and the Greenway.

When the HarborWalk is complete, it will stretch for a total of 46.9 miles — longer than the walk from Boston to Worcester.


HarborArts is turning an East Boston shipyard (part of the HarborWalk) into an outdoor art gallery.

June 2014, South Boston Waterfront, ICA

self-portraits

reflection in jim hodges'  movements  at the ica   (sonya kovacic)

reflection in jim hodges' movements at the ica  (sonya kovacic)

One of the city's most famous self-portraits is a 380-year-old Dutch etching – the size of a postage stamp – that's been missing for almost 25 years:

On March 18, 1990, two men disguised as Boston police officers pulled off one of the largest art heists in world history. They took thirteen pieces of art from Boston's Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, valued at approximately $500 million. The stolen works included paintings by Vermeer, Rembrandt, and Manet; drawings by Degas; a Chinese vase; a French finial (the ornament that tops a flagpole); and a tiny, etched self-portrait by Rembrandt – sized at 2" x 1.75".

Curiously, the Rembrandt etching had been taken from the museum once before. It was stolen in 1970 — in the Gardner's only other major theft in its history. The portrait was returned and reinstalled a few months later, after being discovered on a New York City subway.


Currently, all thirteen works of art are still at large. The FBI is still working on the case, however, and announced just last year that they've identified the criminals involved.


The pop/soul band Lake Street Dive met ten years ago at Boston's New England Conservatory of Music, and went viral in 2012 with a live performance on a Brighton sidewalk.

Their 2014 tour has already sold out, thanks to recent appearances on Letterman, Ellen, and the Colbert Report. Hear their new album's title track: Bad Self Portraits.

May 2014, South Boston Waterfront, ICA

fridays

dancing on the deck at ICA first fridays  (sonya kovacic)

dancing on the deck at ICA first fridays (sonya kovacic)

Although the unlucky origins of "Friday the Thirteenth" are historically unclear, one historian suggests that the superstition became widespread after a Boston millionaire wrote and published a novel in the early 20th century. The man was Thomas W. Lawson, and he was well-known in Boston as a stockbroker, copper magnate, businessman, and even U.S. Senate candidate. In 1907, he published Friday, the Thirteenth, which tells the story of a stockbroker who uses the day to create a stock market crash. The story was a precautionary tale about stock market manipulation, but it's also one of the earliest instances of the day being considered unlucky.

The story doesn't end there. Lawson was known for several other ventures, including his namesake: the giant seven-masted schooner, named, appropriately, the Thomas W. Lawson. The ship was the largest pure sailing vessel ever built, but ultimately crashed and wrecked in a storm. The date? It was the night of December 13, 1907 (a Friday).


Not unlucky: over sixty Boston-area museums and cultural venues will open their doors for free this summer in a series of "Free Fun Fridays."